Like it says, Himalayan is Salt – Not Such a Big Deal

  • Himalayan salts are actually not from the Himalayas. It is sourced from the Khewra Salt Mine in Pakistan, about 300 miles to the west of the Himalayan Mountain Range.
  • This salt mine is the second largest in the world and has been a source of salt for over 2000 years. Despite this lengthy history, the “Himalayan” brand gained popularity in the Western world only in the past 15 years.
  • Himalayan salt varies in color from white to opaque to pink. The pink color is due to the presence of iron oxide. You may know it by its common name – rust.
  • Himalayan salt is about 96% sodium chloride, the same as table salt.
  • The remaining 4% are potassium, calcium, and magnesium, as well as tens of additional trace minerals.
  • Table salt is purified by removing the trace minerals, It is then mixed with an anti-caking agent, usually calcium silicate (an FDA and WHO safety approved additive). Himalayan salt undergoes no such processing.
  • Iodine, a nutrient many people are deficient in, has been added to table salt for years. It is not added to Himalayan salt.
  • The trace minerals present in Himalayan salt make for a slightly different taste, texture and mouth-feel compared to regular table salt.
  • Nutritionally, there is no difference between Himalayan salt and table salt. Don’t buy into the health claims of any marketers of Himalayan salts.
  • Should you be paying a 100-fold premium for Himalayan salt? If you like the flavor, or you think the color is cool – go for it. Don’t do it for health reasons. In any case, most of us need to limit salt consumption, no matter which kind it is.

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Sources:
Mayo ClinicAcademy of Nutrition and Dietetics#NutritionLabelAnalysis #HimalayanSalt #Pink #Pakistan #SodiumChloride #TraceMinerals

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